Monday, June 7, 2010

BACK IN THE DAY - VOLUME SEVEN



timelife001

Civil War
Officers of Irish 69th NY Militia surrounding 8-inch seacoast howitzer as their commander Col. Michael Corcoran (far, L) stands to side, during early days of Civil War, at Fort Corcoran.
Location: Arlington, VA, US
Date taken: 1860

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Civil War
(L-R): Maj. Allan Pinkerton, US Pres. Abraham Lincoln (wearing his trademark stovepipe hat) & Gen. John A. McClernand, in front of pitched tent on battlefield while Civil War is taking place.
Location: Antietam, MD, US
Date taken: October 1862
Photographer: Alexander Gardner

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War And Conflict-Civil War
Cassius M. Clay Battalion defending White House, during Civil War.
Location: Washington, DC, US
Date taken: April 1861

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Rear view of former slave revealing scars on his back from savage whipping, in photo taken after he escaped to become Union soldier during Civil War.
Location: US
Date taken: 1863


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Group of Navajo Indian women working on looms on reservation.
Location: AZ, US
Date taken: 1873

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Snow-covered train tracks, rooftops and arches of the Brooklyn Bridge seen from the rear of a train during the Blizzard of 1888.
Location: Brooklyn, NY, US
Date taken: March 14, 1888
Photographer: Wallace G. Levison

timelife007

Young Isabel Harter riding a tricycle while her sister Nellie rolls a hoop, with other children and adults in background.
Location: Ft Greene, NY, US
Date taken: May 22, 1886
Photographer: Wallace G. Levison

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Wright brothers Wilbur (R) and Orville (at controls) with their 1903 airplane “Kitty Hawk” on first flight lasting twelve seconds.
Location: Kitty Hawk, NC, US
Date taken: December 17, 1903

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Crowd gathered in front of buildings felled by massive earthquake which rocked the San Francisco area.
Location: San Francisco, CA, US
Date taken: April 18, 1906

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British sailors marching through Whitehall during celebration of Victory Day, commemorating the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the end of World War I.
Location: London, United Kingdom
Date taken: July 19, 1919

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Migrant mother Florence Thompson and children photographed by Dorothea Lange.
Location: Nipomo, CA, US
Date taken: 1936
Photographer: Dorothea Lange

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Laundry wagon being pulled past tenement bldgs. in slums of New York City.
Location: New York, NY, US
Date taken: October 1937
Photographer: Margaret Bourke-White

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U.S. Navy at Hawaii.
Location: HI, US
Date taken: 1940
Photographer: Carl Mydans

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Squadron of Douglas TBD torpedo bombers in flight during the US Navy’s Pacific fleet maneuvers.
Location: HI, US
Date taken: September 1940
Photographer: Carl Mydans

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Roosevelt
US Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt (C) riding in jeep, visiting US troops stationed in Sicily during WW II.
Location: Italy
Date taken: 1944

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Aerial of ships in Pearl Harbor Navy Yard.
Location: Hawaii, US
Date taken: 1945
Photographer: W. Eugene Smith

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University of Hawaii girls who are chosen by the student body to serve as Princesses and Queen in annual May Day ceremony held at the University.
Location: HI, US
Date taken: September 1945
Photographer: Eliot Elisofon
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timelife035

Geyser “Old Faithful” erupting in Yellowstone National Park.
Location: WY, US
Date taken: 1946
Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt
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timelife033

Jackie Robinson
Baseball great Jackie Robinson during filming of “The Jackie Robinson Story”.
Location: CA, US
Date taken: March 1950
Photographer: J. R. Eyerman
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timelife031

Actress Marilyn Monroe at home.
Location: Hollywood, CA, US
Date taken: 1953
Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt
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c

Sen. John Kennedy (R) w. bride Jacqueline (L) in wedding attire, sitting together at table, eating pineapple salad at formally set table outdoors at their wedding reception.
Location: Newport, RI, US
Date taken: September 1953
Photographer: Lisa Larsen
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timelife034

Colorado Dust Bowl
Dust storm rising over farmer walking across his plowed field away from windmill and corral already choked with pile of dust on farm.
Location: Hartman, CO, US
Date taken: May 1954
Photographer: Margaret Bourke-White
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timelife037

Second Siege/Petersburg, Va
Rev. Martin Luther King, at Atlanta University for SCLC-sponsored student conference.
Location: Atlanta, GA, US
Date taken: May 1960
Photographer: Howard Sochurek
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timelife026A

Jackie Kennedy
Jackie Kennedy helping daughter Caroline put on her rain hat and slicker before going out to play, at home.
Location: Hyannis Port, MA, US
Date taken: September 13, 1960
Photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt
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timelife025

Jacqueline Kennedy attending the inauguration of her husband, Pres. John F. Kennedy.
Location: Washington, DC, US
Date taken: January 20, 1961
Photographer: Paul Schutzer
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timelife029

Surfing In Hawaii
Surfers, Sunset Beach, Oahu, Hawaii.
Location: HI, US
Date taken: 1963
Photographer: George Silk
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timelife030

Surfing In Hawaii
Photographer: George Silk
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timelife036

Horizontal view of huge crowd gathered on the Mall between the Lincoln and Washington Monument during the civil rights March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Location: Washington, DC, US
Date taken: August 28, 1963
Photographer: Robert W. Kelley
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timelife039

Commuters reading of John F. Kennedy’s assassination.
Location: NY, US
Date taken: November 1963
Photographer: Carl Mydans
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timelife038

RFK Assassination
Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy (on floor in fore) being comforted by busboy Juan Romero (R - in white jacket) and others as camera crews hover about following (fatal) shooting by Palestinian Sirhan Sirhan.
Location: CA, US
Date taken: June 05, 1968
Photographer: Bill Eppridge
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timelife018

Apollo X
View of earth taken fr. Apollo 10 space ship, w. peninsula of Baja, CA seen through swirling cloud cover.
Date taken: May 1969

timelife019

Splashdown of Apollo XI mission.
Date taken: July 24, 1969
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timelife020

Apollo XI astronaut Buzz Aldrin standing on surface of Moon near leg of Lunar Module “Eagle” w. reflection of astronaut Neil Armstrong & module shining on face mask.
Date taken: July 20, 1969
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timelife021

Boxer Muhammad Ali.
Location: FL, US
Date taken: 1971
Photographer: John Shearer
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timelife022

Boxer Muhammad Ali training for his fight against Joe Frazier.
Location: Miami Beach, FL, US
Date taken: 1971
Photographer: John Shearer
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timelife023

Boxer Joe Frazier having his beard combed before an appearence with his singing group ” The Knockouts.”
Location: US
Date taken: 1971
Photographer: John Shearer
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timelife024A

Joe Frazier vs. Mohammed Ali at Madison Square Garden.
Location: New York, NY, US
Date taken: March 08, 1971
Photographer: John Shearer
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Group portrait of entire Walt Disney World staff, including cast of costumed Disney characters in fore, standing in front of Cinderella Castle prior to grand opening of amusement park.
Location: Orlando, FL, US
Date taken: October 15, 1971
Photographer: Yale Joel
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timelife028

There’s been some debate over the location of this image in the comments section but here’s the link to the photo in the archive and it’s identified as Times Square although I’ve found some of the caption info to be incorrect while searching through the photos. Since I’ve had so many comments, I’ve taken it down to New York!
New York
Photographer: Andreas Feininger
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c

Jill St. John
Closeup of beautifully weathered hands of Navajo woman modeling turquoise bracelet & ring made by Native Americans.
Location: NM, US
Date taken: September 1972
Photographer: Michael Mauney
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timelife032

1972 Winter Olympics
90 meter ski jump during the 1972 Olympics.
Location: Sapporo, Japan
Date taken: 1972
Photographer: John Dominis

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FEMME FATALE

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RAY CHARLES: LOOKING BACK

As his 80th birthday approaches, a look at the life and legacy of the late Ray Charles.


"I just do what I do." That's what Ray Charles told Billboard in June 2002 when asked to assess his role in music history. Of course, Charles' self-effacing response belies a groundbreaking career and a legacy that endures today, as fans look toward celebrating what would have been the legendary artist's 80th birthday Sept. 23. Looking back at Charles' storied career, what comes to mind is the phrase "musical genius." In Charles' case, that's no hype.


Rare & Unseen Ray Charles Photos | Charles on the Charts

80th Birthday Year Events | Charles Charity


In 1954, the artist's melding of gospel and blues yielded the pioneering hit "I've Got a Woman"-and forged an indelible imprint on R&B, rock and pop. His earthy, soulful voice graced a steady stream of classics after "Woman," including "Drown in My Own Tears," "What'd I Say," "Hit the Road Jack," "Unchain My Heart," "I Can't Stop Loving You" and "Georgia on My Mind."

Video below: Ray Charles performs "Hit The Road Jack" in São Paulo, Brazil on September 22, 1963.


Video below: Ray Charles performs "Then I'll Be Home" in Montreux, Switzerland on July 19, 1997.


Just as at home on the Hammond B-3 organ as he was on the piano, he also landed at the top of Billboard's R&B, pop, country and jazz charts-and even the dance chart, collaborating with childhood friend Quincy Jones and Chaka Khan on "I'll Be Good to You."

His final recording, 2004's "Genius Loves Company," made history when it won eight Grammy Awards, including album and record of the year for his pairing with Norah Jones on "Here We Go Again."

But what many may not know is that the inimitable Charles was also a genius when it came to the business side of music. In the early '60s he negotiated a rare feat after leaving Atlantic Records to sign with ABC-Paramount: ownership of his own master recordings. He also established his own labels. Tangerine (his favorite fruit) came first, which later evolved into CrossOver Records.

A songwriter who penned nearly 200 songs, Charles also operated his own publishing companies, Tangerine Music and Racer Music. For these entities, Charles and longtime manager Joe Adams designed and built the RPM International office and studios on Washington Boulevard in Los Angeles. The Ray Charles Memorial Library will open in the building this fall.

Charles also found time to manage the careers of other acts, including Billy Preston and '70s R&B group the Friends of Distinction. And way before it was de rigueur for artists to do, Charles set up what became a foundation to help needy children with hearing disabilities and later on support education.


He was an amazing human being," says Jones, 77, who became friends with Charles when both were scrappy teenagers in Seattle. "A true innovator who revolutionized music and the business of music," he adds. "Growing up, we only had the radio; no Michael Jackson, Diddy or Oprah. So it was hard to imagine today's entrepreneurial world. But that didn't stop us. We spent a lot of time talking and dreaming about things that brothers had never done before."

"He really was a genius," says singer Solomon Burke, a former Atlantic labelmate. "He did things the way he wanted."

Charles was born Ray Charles Robinson Sept. 23, 1930, in Albany, Ga. As many learned through actor Jamie Foxx's Academy Award-winning portrayal in the 2004 film "Ray," Charles became blind by age 7 and orphaned at 15 while growing up in northwest Florida.

In eight years at a state school for the blind, the young Charles learned how to read and write music. Leaving Florida in 1947, he headed for Seattle ("Choosing the farthest place he could find from Florida," Jones says), where he notched his first hit two years later as a member of the Maxin Trio, "Confession Blues."

Even then, Charles was an enterprising individual. "He had his own apartment, record player, two pairs of pimp shoes, and here I am still living at home," Jones recalls with a laugh. "His mother trained him not to be blind: no cane, no dogs, no cup. His scuffed-up shoes... that was his guide and driving force. He was the most independent dude I ever saw in my life. Ray would get blind only when pretty girls came around."

Signing with Atlantic Records in 1952, Charles as a West Coast jazz and blues man recorded such songs as "It Should've Been Me" and label co-founder Ahmet Ertegun's composition, "Mess Around."

Then he connected in 1954 with "I've Got a Woman," which set off a chain reaction of more hits capitalizing on his bold gospel/blues fusion. But Charles was just getting started. In 1958, he performed at the Newport Jazz Festival, accompanied by a band that featured such jazz cats as saxophonists David "Fathead" Newman and Hank Crawford. Further bucking convention, he recorded "The Genius of Ray Charles," a 1959 release offering standards on one side (including "Come Rain or Come Shine") and big band numbers on the other, featuring members of Count Basie's orchestra and several arrangements by Jones.


Video below: Charles' 1966 Coke commercial, "So Tired."



Leaving Atlantic for ABC-Paramount, a fearless Charles recorded the seminal "Genius + Soul = Jazz" album in 1961. A year later, his earlier dabbling in country music grew serious with the release of the million-selling "Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music."

Complemented by lush strings and a harmony-rich choir, he scored with covers of Don Gibson's "I Can't Stop Loving You" and Ted Daffan's "Born to Lose"-and spent 14 weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard 200.




For a black man to do this in 1962 was unheard of," says Tony Gumina, president of the Ray Charles Marketing Group, which handles the late artist's licensing affairs. "He was trying to sell records to people who didn't want to drink from the same water fountain as him. But this was one of his greatest creative and business moves: to not be categorized musically and cross over. Though he never worried about it, he was resigned to the fact that he might lose some core fans. But he thought he'd gain far more in the process."

Gumina was operating his own promotion company working with state lotteries when he met Charles in 1999. The two teamed up on a series of commercials for various state lotteries and also introduced a line of Ray Charles slot machines also accessible to the blind.

"Everything he did had a business acumen to it," says Gumina, who cites Charles' liaison with manager Adams as a pivotal turning point. Originally hired to be Charles' stage announcer, former radio DJ Adams segued into overseeing production of the singer's shows, lighting and wardrobe.

Together the pair designed and built Charles' L.A. business base, RPM International (Recording, Publishing and Management) studio. When he began recording there in 1965, the label rented the studio from him, so he made money on his recordings before they were even released.

To save money on travel expenses, Charles purchased an airplane to ferry his band around to gigs. A smaller plane was also acquired so that Charles could wing in to, say, New York to record a couple of songs before flying back out in time for a show.

"He understood the entertainment business enough to know that you may not be popular forever," Gumina says, "and you need to maximize your product. At the same time, he had as much fun as any rock star but without the sad money stories. There was a time to work and a time to play, and he knew the difference. He didn't have a bunch of homes or a large entourage. That's why he was able to save $50 million before he died."

Calling Charles an "incredibly smart man," Concord president John Burk says he learned a lot from the ailing singer while he was recording his final studio album, "Genius Loves Company."

Video below: Ray Charles performs "It Ain't Easy Being Green" in Trentnton, NJ on Nov. 7, 2002.


Going through "some sticky deal points, he was amazing," Burk recalls. "He had the whole agreement in his head. Without referencing any material, he knew all the terms we proposed and had the deal done for the album in two discussions."

Creatively, Burk says Charles was an artist dedicated to delivering "a true performance from the heart. Part of his creative legacy was his approach to singing. He opened the door to vocal improvisations, changing how people perceived you could sing a song. Many singers today are influenced by him and they don't even know it."


Rare & Unseen Ray Charles Photos | Charles on the Charts

80th Birthday Year Events | Charles Charity

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I HATE CRACKHEAD VAMPIRE MOMMIES THAT FORGET TO LEAVE JUNIOR SOME BLOOD IN THE FRIDGE FOR BREAKFAST.
NOW I GOTSTA GO AND SUCK SOME BLOOD OUT OF MISS TANDY THE MATH TEACHER 
SHE'S GONNA END UP GIVING ME AN "F" IN CARDASSIAN GEOMETRY
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